Moist will have to grapple with gallons of grease, goblins, a fat controller with a history of throwing employees down the stairs and some very angry dwarfs if he's going to stop it all going off the rails..., Sybil Deidre Olgivanna Ramkin, DEATH, Adora Belle Dearheart, Angua von Ɯberwald, Cheery Littlebottom, Mustrum Ridcully, Detritus, Sir Harry King, Dick Simnel, Fred Colon, Mr Thunderbolt, Of the Twilight the Darkness, Mr Crucible Wesley, Lady Margolotta, Bashfull Bashfullson, Rhys Rhysson, Lu-Tze, Aeron I was troubled while reading this book. I loved it, personally, but make sure you catch the last book in the series, The Shepherd's Crown, which was published after his death & is more of a Tiffany Aching & the witches book, but the final book in the series - I found it very poignant considering his long illness and passing between completion and publication . comment about the dwarves faces - I saw that as a Sam line - he got VERY upset about things & much more abrasive than Moist, for instance - the combination of those two feels of story lines was fascinating to me, and I personally enjoyed it. For one thing, it's hard for me to view this book as a thing unto itself. I Shall Wear Midnight might have been the last Tiffany Aching.

Steam updating toad video

Some of the scenes felt more described or summarized rather than fully executed. Bashfull's character seemed oddly different than when he appeared in Thud! Also, it seemed odd that in a book where a *lot* of familiar characters appeared for cameos... Especially since so much of the book was centered around the dwarves. I hope to pick it up again in another year or so, and wonder at why I was so bitchy my first time around....

Pratchett has more than earned a second chance with me.

Unseen Academicals probably wraps it up for the wizards.

To the consternation of the patrician, Lord Vetinari, a new invention has arrived in Ankh-Morpork - a great clanging monster of a machine that harnesses the power of all the elements: earth, air, fire and water. He has Alzheimers, and from what I understand, it's progressing to an unfortunate degree. Was it an enjoyable read and a good use of my time? Carrot is a dangerous character as he moves in straight lines and tends to solve problems by sheer force of his personality. Lord Vetinari feels the winds of change blowing and puts Moist von Lipwig in charge of the burgeoning railway industry. Then the rhythm caught and soon it was full steam ahead. I was also pleased to see Vimes, Harry King, Lao-Tze, Mustrum Ridcully, and other old favorites make appearances.

This being Ankh-Morpork, it's soon drawing astonished crowds, some of whom caught the zeitgeist early and arrive armed with notepads and very sensible rainwear. That's what my heart wanted, even though my brain knows full well that that is a profoundly ridiculous thing to wish for. When I pick up one of his books, I can't help thinking about that. For example, when I first read Unseen Academicals, I found myself thinking, "Oh no. Even so, for him to not appear at all when so many of the other guardsmen were present in the story, with no explanation of why he's absent.... The fascination with the Iron Girder and the rest of the trains was completely understandable since I'm part of the large segment of the male population that is oddly fascinated with trains. To me, this one's about Moist and the Discworld growing up, maturing. Tea Party, but not so specifically that readers in other countries couldn't recognize their fringe conservatives too. Surely the whole point of the book is that some technologies are just so transformative that it is impossible to resist them, and as such there won't be as much conflict.

Moi To the consternation of the patrician, Lord Vetinari, a new invention has arrived in Ankh-Morpork - a great clanging monster of a machine that harnesses the power of all the elements: earth, air, fire and water. This obviously isn't as good as his other work...." But when I read it a second time, years later, I thought it was a perfectly fine example of his writing. The goblins acclimating to life in Ankh-Morpork was another nice touch. To me, this one's about Moist and the Discworld growing up, maturing. Tea Party, but not so specifically that readers in other countries couldn't recognize their fringe c OK, 4.6 rounded up. And I suspect it's a wish that Roundworld would too. I rather like the way Vetinari seems not to care any more that the audience can see the strings by which he controls everything.This being Ankh-Morpork, it's soon drawing astonished crowds, some of whom caught the zeitgeist early and arrive armed with notepads and very sensible rainwear. So what I was really looking for here was a brilliant book. The usual Discworld social commentary is present, as is the usual making me grin like a jackass. And I suspect it's a wish that Roundworld would too. I've seen a lot of reviews here that panned this book but seemed to be doing so mostly because it wasn't what they wanted it to be. He has a girlfriend in Uberwald and doesn't care who knows it.Moist von Lipwig is not a man who enjoys hard work - as master of the Post Office, the Mint and the Royal Bank his input is, of course, vital... "Tak never mentioned that dwarfs should cover their faces in the society of their friends. That's what my heart wanted, even This is a tricky book for me to review. I even enjoyed the dwarfish subplot as I drew near the end, although it still seemed a little off. I've seen a lot of reviews here that panned this book but seemed to be doing so mostly because it wasn't what they wanted it to be. Speaking of Vetinari, the I-won't-spoil-it about him at the end didn't work for me.but largely dependent on words, which are fortunately not very heavy and don't always need greasing. Vetinari, Moist, Adora-belle etc but their names could have been interchangeable. I recognise Sir Terry's struggle with his health, but I get the distinct impression that someone else, with a lesser grasp of the intricacies of this fantastical world, is wielding the pen. It struck Rhys that this practice was deliberately provocative and, of course, disdainful." - Raising Steam by Terry Pratchett. For one thing, it's hard for me to view this book as a thing unto itself. It's not the best Discworld book out there but even on his worst day, Terry Pratchett always manages to keep me entertained. And I was underwhelmed by the solution for the weak bridge at the end.However, he does enjoy being alive, which makes a new job offer from Vetinari hard to refuse... "Tak never mentioned th I was troubled while reading this book. We know how incisive Sir Terry can be regarding politics, religion and so forth. This direct comment, without his usual humour or satire struck me as a little sharp. So what I was really looking for here was a brilliant book. Anyone who knows anything about my reading habits knows that I'm a huge fan of Terry Pratchett. It only barely holds together, and surely wouldn't stand close examination.Steam is rising over Discworld, driven by Mister Simnel, the man wi' t'flat cap and sliding rule who has an interesting arrangement with the sine and cosine. Vetinari, Moist, Adora-belle etc but their names could have been interchangeable. I recognise Sir Terry's struggle with his health, but I get the distinct impression that someone else, with a lesser grasp of the intricacies of this fantastical world, is wielding the pen. Unfortunately, this was not how I wished to say goodbye to the Discworld and the characters I fell in love with, but if future novels will just mangle the memories I have, perhaps it is best I farewell here. Despite rumours that Moist will move to taxes next, I have to think this is the last Moist novel.