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This is the comedy equivalent of the Rule of Cool, and is accordingly weighted more in comedy shows.

Especially easy to invoke in humor-based American animation and webcomics, where people expect the lack of realism in the art to translate to other areas. One of the characteristics of the rule of funny is that it can give some abilities to a character to the sole purpose of a gag, which means the character just CAN'T do that when it's not funny.

For instance, it happened multiple times to Wile E.

Coyote to walk on thin air because he had not noticed that he was at the edge of a cliff, and he falls when he notices it.

It is Rule of Funny: Coyote can't walk on thin air as a previewed part of a scheme.

Juran suggested the principle and named it after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who, while at the University of Lausanne in 1896, published his first paper "Cours d'économie politique." Essentially, Pareto showed that approximately 80% of the land in Italy was owned by 20% of the population; Pareto developed the principle by observing that 20% of the peapods in his garden contained 80% of the peas.

It is a common rule of thumb in business; e.g., "80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients." Mathematically, the 80–20 rule is roughly followed by a power law distribution (also known as a Pareto distribution) for a particular set of parameters, and many natural phenomena have been shown empirically to exhibit such a distribution.

He then carried out surveys on a variety of other countries and found to his surprise that a similar distribution applied.

A chart that gave the inequality a very visible and comprehensible form, the so-called 'champagne glass' effect, was contained in the 1992 United Nations Development Program Report, which showed that distribution of global income is very uneven, with the richest 20% of the world's population controlling 82.7% of the world's income.

The more predictions a theory makes, the greater the chance is of some of them being cheaply testable.

Modifications of existing theories make much fewer new unique predictions, increasing the risk that the few predictions remaining are very expensive to test.