If we’re criticized at work we must be getting fired.It’s not that we don’t necessarily understand these things aren’t reasonable; it’s just that we can’t help the way our brain thinks, the way it leaps.Not everyone jumps to the extremes, but people with bipolar seem to have that tendency.

Worried and anxious bipolar thoughts are very common and, what’s worse, is that seeing as we also obsess, we tend to obsessively worry or feel obsessively anxious. It’s not very surprising that due to all these odd thoughts, due to all the extreme, obsessive and distracting thoughts that we overreact to situations.

And then there are all the distracted-, multi-tasking-type thoughts. If your brain automatically goes to a catastrophe situation and then becomes obsessed with it, it’s really tough to have a moderate response – even when it’s a moderate situation.

People with bipolar disorder have higher rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and regardless as to whether you have ADHD, people with bipolar disorder tend to think in ADHD-type ways. I’m sure this frustrates the people around us to no end, but I have to say, it frustrates me considerably more.

This is an interesting question: how does a person with bipolar disorder think?

Of course, it’s hard for me to compare it with your average person as I have bipolar disorder.

I don’t have the two thought processes in my one brain to compare.

This is not to say that we all think the same way; nevertheless, I do have some ideas on how people with bipolar disorder think that seem to stand out amongst the “normals.” Your average person may have obsessive thoughts, now and then, I don’t know, but what I do know is that people with bipolar disorder have obsessive thoughts a lot of the time.

These obsessive bipolar thoughts may be a repeating song from the radio, scenarios (such as a suicide scene) or a replaying of events (often negative ones), but obsessive thoughts seem to be the rule rather than the exception.

Note that research bears this out indicating that people with bipolar disorder have higher rates of obsessive-compulsive disorder than the average population. And, of course, there are all the thoughts that go along with these things.